UCED and Consumer Advisory Council

The Institute on Disability is a member of the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD), a network of 67 university-based Centers located in every state and territory in the United States that receive funding by the Administration on Intellectual Developmental Disabilities (AIDD). Centers work with people with disabilities, members of their families, state and local government agencies, and community providers in projects that provide training, technical assistance, service, research, and information sharing, with a focus on building the capacity of communities to sustain all their citizens. The Consumer Advisory Council (CAC) is a primary way the IOD involves consumers to guide the activities and priorities of the Institute.

 

A University Center for Excellence in Disability

Association of University Centers on Disabilities logo

AUCD: Association of University Centers on Disabilities. Research, Education, Service.The Institute on Disability is a member of the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD), a network of 67 university-based Centers located in every state and territory in the United States that receive funding by the Administration on Intellectual Developmental Disabilities (AIDD). Organizationally, AIDD is located within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Administration on Community Living (ACL), the Federal agency responsible for implementation and administration of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000 (DD Act). The source of this funding is a discretionary grant program authorized by Subtitle D of the DD Act and is essential for organizational administration and operations by providing a stable base from which the IOD can attract additional support from such sources as local, state, and federal grants and contracts, fees for services, and university support. The IOD, working with the Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, is the flagship for New Hampshire's University Center for Excellence in Disability (UCED).

Since 1963, UCEDs have been working to accomplish a shared vision that foresees a nation in which all Americans, including Americans with disabilities, participate fully in their communities. Independence, productivity, and community inclusion are key components of this vision.

Centers are in a unique position to facilitate the flow of disability-related information between community and university. Centers work with people with disabilities, members of their families, state and local government agencies, and community providers in projects that provide training, technical assistance, service, research, and information sharing, with a focus on building the capacity of communities to sustain all their citizens. Centers have played key roles in every major disability initiative over the past four decades. Many issues, such as early intervention, health care, community-based services, inclusive and meaningful education, transition from school to work, employment, housing, assistive technology, and transportation have been directly benefited by the services, research, and training provided by UCEDs.

As a UCED, the IOD is designed to increase the independence, productivity, and community integration and inclusion of individuals with developmental disabilities and works closely with local and state agencies to advance policies and practices that improve the quality of life for children and adults with disabilities and their families.

For more information, visit the AUCD website at www.aucd.org 

The Mission of the Consumer Advisory Council (CAC)

People with disabilities and their families are central to how the Institute on Disability (IOD) plans, carries out, and evaluates its activities. The Consumer Advisory Council (CAC) is a primary way the IOD involves consumers to guide the activities and priorities of the Institute. CAC members meet 4 times a year and support the IOD's work in the following ways:

  • Serves as a link to consumers and consumer-based organizations.
  • Encourages others to become involved with the IOD.
  • Makes suggestions about critical areas of need to be addressed through future activities.
  • Supports the vision, mission, and values of the IOD by providing information and advice on issues affecting individuals with disabilities living in New Hampshire and their families.
  • Consults with the leadership of the IOD regarding the development and implementation of the Institute's five-year plan.
  • Provides the leadership of the IOD feedback on proposals and initiatives such as grant applications and other actions planned or considered by the Institute.
  • Points out to the leadership of the IOD matters that, in the Council's opinion, require attention on the part of the Institute.
  • Presents the unique perspectives and views of people with disabilities living in New Hampshire and their families.

What are the responsibilities of CAC members?

  • Serve at least a three-year term.
  • Attend the quarterly meetings and as many of the CAC functions and special events as possible.
  • Become informed and stay informed about the mission, services, policies, and programs of the IOD.
  • Represent their own interests related to disability issues as well as the interests of the communities they represent.
  • Take an active role in the development of the IOD's five-year strategic plan.
  • Inform others about the organization and act as a communication link between the IOD and the people, agencies, and organizations in their community.
  • Identify people who can make significant contributions to the work of the IOD and draw them into the network of people committed to community-wide change for people with disabilities.

Who belongs to the CAC?

  • There are anywhere between 12 and 20 CAC members at any given time.
  • The CAC is representative of different age groups, disabilities, and regions of New Hampshire and reflects the state's racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic diversity.
  • The CAC includes representatives from a number of organizations including the Developmental Disabilities Council, the Disabilities Rights Center, and People First. In addition, members may include representatives of the Parent Information Center, graduates of New Hampshire Leadership, and other relevant state agencies.
  • All members of the CAC are consumers. At least one-third of the members are individuals with disabilities and at least two-thirds are parents, other immediate relatives, or legal guardians.

CAC Members

  • Lisa D. Beaudoin, Temple, NH
  • Forrest Beaudoin-Friede, Peterborough, NH
  • Jennifer Bertrand, Mont Vernon, NH
  • Deodonne Bhattarai, Concord, NH 
  • Gina Colantuoni, Bow, NH
  • Bonnie Dunham, Merrimack, NH
  • Bob English, Peterborough, NH
  • Richard Johnson, Laconia, NH
  • Darienne McGuinness, Stratham, NH
  • Stephanie Patrick, Concord, NH
  • Danielle Poirier, Nashua, NH
  • Jill Prakop, Derry, NH
  • Isadora Rodriguez-Legendre, Concord, NH
  • Marie Primeau, Peterborough, NH
  • Crissy Shaffer, Litchfield, NH
  • Jan Skoby, Concord, NH
  • Kathryn Wallenstein, Concord, NH

Who can I contact to learn more about the CAC?

If you have any questions or are interested in becoming a member, please contact:

Cat Jones, Institute on Disability / UCED
57 Regional Drive, Unit 8
Concord, NH 03301
603-228-2084
Cat.Jones@unh.edu