Courses

Faculty from the IOD teach undergraduate and graduate level courses through UNH’s Colleges of Liberal Arts and Health and Human Services. These courses provide students with current research, best practices, historical insight, and hands-on experience. The current list of courses taught by IOD faculty includes:

COMM 701 - Principles of Assessment
Instructor:
Rae Sonnenmeier, Ph.D.
Credits: 2.0
Term: Summer
Principles and practice for diagnosis of speech and language disorders; examination procedures and measurement techniques. Accelerated Master's CSD majors only.

COMM 703 - Ethics and Professional Issues
Instructor: Rae Sonnenmeier, Ph.D.
Credits: 1.0
Term: Fall
Description: Introduction to ethical and professional issues that professionals will encounter in various work settings including regulatory, billing practices, service delivery models, and the role of advocacy for client services. Accelerated Master's CSD majors only.

COMM 723 - Observation Skills in Speech-Language Pathology
Instructor:
Rae Sonnenmeier, Ph.D.
Credits: 2.0
Term: Summer
This course is designed to provide opportunities to observe clients with communication disorders. Observations will include both assessment and intervention techniques. Students successfully completing this course will accrue observation hours that can be applied to the requirement for graduate studies.

COMM 795 - Independent Study
Instructor: Rae Sonnenmeier, Ph.D.
Credits: 1.0 to 8.0
Term: Fall
Description: Individual or group projects involving directed study of an area of communication sciences and disorders that students wish to explore in greater depth than is covered in the required curriculum.

COMM 801 - Principles of Assessment
Instructor:
Rae Sonnenmeier, Ph.D.
Credits: 2.0
Term: Summer
Principles and practice for diagnosis of speech and language disorders; examination procedures and measurement techniques.

COMM 803 - Ethics and Professional Issues
Instructor: Rae Sonnenmeier, Ph.D.
Credits: 1.0
Term: Fall
Description: Introduction to ethical and professional issues that professionals will encounter in various work settings including regulatory, billing practices, service delivery models, and the role of advocacy for client services.

COMM 831 - Early Childhood Language Disorders
Instructor: Rae Sonnenmeier, Ph.D.
Credits: 3.0
Term: Fall
Examination of interrelationships between early language, social, and cognitive development, with emphasis on collaborative inter-professional models of assessment and intervention. Reviews implications for special populations (e.g., intellectual and developmental delay/disorder, autism spectrum disorder, sensory impairment, and English language learners).

COMM 870 - Clinical Practicum
Instructor:
Rae Sonnenmeier, Ph.D.
Credits: 1.0
Term: Fall
On-campus practicum provides graduate students with the opportunity to apply advanced theoretical knowledge in clinical setting with clients demonstrating speech, language, hearing, and/or swallowing disorders. Students acquire therapy and diagnostic experience under supervision. A minimum of 3 credits is required for the M.S. degree.

COMM 872 - Externship
Instructor:
Rae Sonnenmeier, Ph.D.
Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall
Application of advanced theoretical knowledge through clinical work in an off-campus clinical setting. Prereq: COMM 870, Clinical Practicum with a grade of "B" or above.A maximum of total of 8 credits required.

COMM 895 - Special Topics
Instructor:
Rae Sonnenmeier, Ph.D.
Credits: 1.0
Term: Fall
Advanced study in specific areas; involves an independent project. Prereq: permission. May be repeated.

ECON 727 - Advanced Econometrics
Instructor:
Andrew Houtenville, Ph.D.
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring
Method of least squares estimation with treatments for hereogeneity and endogeneity. Method of maximum likelihood estimation. Binary choice models. Panel data models. Survival analysis. Topics employ calculus.

EDUC 750/850 - Introduction to Exceptionality
Instructor:
Mary Schuh, Ph.D.
Credits: 4.0
When Offered: Spring
Description: A life span perspective of the social, psychological, and physical characteristics of individuals with exceptionalities including intellectual, sensory, motor, health, and communication impairments. Includes implications for educational and human service delivery.

EDUC 750/850 - Introduction to Exceptionality
Instructor:
Mary Schuh, Ph.D.
Credits: 4.0
When Offered: Fall 2013 at UNH Manchester
Description: This course will provide opportunities through readings, film, class and Blackboard discussion, guest presentations, and lecture to enhance understanding of the personal and educational experiences of individuals with disabilities and their families. A variety of disabilities will be explored including issues surrounding medical and family perspectives, societal and medical constructs, access to education, and labeling. Information will be presented and discussed within the framework of inclusive schools and communities, family-centered practices, and self-directed services.

EDUC 754/854 - Contemporary Issues in Developmental Disabilities
Instructor:
TBD
Credits: 4.0
When Offered: Fall every year
Description: This course explores the meaning of disability from historical and contemporary perspectives. The influence of a variety of disability paradigms – including deviance, deficiency, pity, and diversity – on educational programs and policies will be discussed. The course is co-taught by a university faculty member and a person with a disability and numerous guest speakers who live with disability will share their perspectives on education and adult life.

EDUC 755/855 - Social Relationships for Students with Significant Disabilities
Instructor:
TBD
Credits: 2.0
When Offered: Spring every other year
Description: The course will focus on the classroom and individual supports needed by students with intellectual and other developmental disabilities, including autism spectrum disorders, in order to have a wide variety of satisfying social relationships. Participants in the class will (a) identify the factors that are essential to the development of shared social understanding between students with and without disabilities; (b) recognize and mitigate barriers to reciprocal relationships; and (c) work with a student, his/her family, and educational team to expand that student’s participation in inclusive social activities.

EDUC 757/857 - Contemporary Issues in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Instructor:
TBD
Credits: 4.0
When Offered: Fall every year
Description: The goal of this course is to enhance students’ understanding of contemporary issues related to educating students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The course is grounded in a theoretical foundation that values the perspectives of individuals with ASD in academic, research, policy, and clinical endeavors. Learning outcomes focus on strategies for identifying opportunities for learning, communication, literacy, and social relationships in a variety of inclusive environments. May be repeated up to a maximum of 8 credits. Permission required. Prerequisite: Institute on Disability Autism Summer Institute.

EDUC 797/897 - Seminar in Contemporary Educational Problems: Using the iPad to Support Children with Disabilities
Instructors:
Therese Willkomm, Ph.D.
Credits: 3.0
When Offered: J-Term Online
Description: The iPad is changing the way we teach and learn. This technology embraces Universal design principles (UDL) and enables children with significant disabilities to learn in ways never thought possible five years ago. It is a tool for delivering multimedia content and embraces the use of multi-modal learning. This technology finally levels the playing field to support all students including students with disabilities.This online course consists of 8 modules. Each module will include lecture(s), iPad hands on activities, asynchronous video chats, and assignments. Lectures will include demonstration of iPad features, apps, apps resources, adaptations and applied learning activities. Required: Use of an iPad 2 or newer version and internet access.

EDUC 900B - Internship and Seminar/Early Childhood Education
Instructor:
TBD
Credits: 3.0
When Offered: Spring
Description: A two semester, supervised internship with a weekly seminar. Admission by application.

EDUC 944 - Inclusive Curriculum for Young Children
Instructor:
TBD
Credits: 4.0
When Offered: Spring
Description: Classroom applications of constructivist theory. Curriculum planning and implementation; overview of research and theory related to teaching and learning of specific content areas, with emphasis on integrated approach to early childhood curriculum. Stresses the reciprocal nature of student-teacher relationship. Prerequisite: permission.

EDUC 952 - Assessment, Curriculum, Instruction, and Supports for Students with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Instructor:
TBD
Credits: 4.0
When Offered: Fall every other year
Description: This class will present a model for planning instruction and supports that promote students’ full participation and learning of the general education curriculum within an inclusive general education classroom (preschool – high school). Students will learn how to design, implement, and evaluate supports in the categories of adapted materials, assistive technology, sensory, environmental, and emotional.

EDUC 954 - Leadership & Systems Change in Special Education
Instructor:
TBD
Credits: 2.0
When Offered: Spring every other year
Description: Leadership and advocacy are vital skills for teachers of students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This course provides the knowledge and skills for educators to begin to initiate change processes within schools to benefit students with and without disabilities. Several models of systems change and sustainability of innovations will be presented and participants will develop a plan for facilitating change in their schools.

HHS 444 - The Right to be Disabled in the Extreme Makeover Society
Instructor:
TBD
Credits: 4.0
When Offered: Spring
Description: Explores how society's view of disability, its "construction," is influenced by a variety of cultural variables and the implications of that construction on institutions such as medicine and health care, education, the arts, the legal system, architecture and engineering, etc.

HHS 798/898 - Special Topics in Neurodevelopmental Disorders (LEND) Seminar
Instructor:
Betsy Humphreys   
Credits: 3.0
When Offered: Fall & Spring
Description: Explores areas related to specific professional health interests. May repeat but not duplicate subject areas. A) Communication Disorders, B) Health Management and Policy, C) Medical Laboratory Science, D) Nursing, E) Occupational Therapy, F) Kinesiology, G) Recreation Management and Policy, J) Family Studies, K) Social Work, L) Health Promotion, M-Z) Interdisciplinary. Prerequisite: permission. Special fee on some topics.

KIN 798/898 - Person-Centered Planning
Instructor:
TBD
Credits: 4.0/3.0
When Offered: Summer
Description: An intensive five-day course designed to help develop the competencies needed to facilitate consumer and family-directed life planning. This course incorporates lecture, role-playing, action learning, and peer support to provide an interactive forum for participants to develop and practice effective group facilitation skills. The curriculum addresses theories of group development, offering experiential methods for process design, questioning and recording skills, and strategic planning.

SW 697 - Special Topics: Adolescents with Emotional and Behavioral Challenges: Issues, Practices, and Culture
Instructor:
JoAnne Malloy, Ph.D.
Credits: 4.0
When Offered: Spring
Description: This course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the nature of the disorder, based upon socio-cultural and ecological theories, as well as exposure to evidence-informed practices and approaches that represent System of Care values and principles. Students will also have the opportunity to delve into a particular issue or practice of interest to them.

SW 897 (3BB) - Special Topics in Social Work and Social Welfare - Mental Health Aspects of IDD
Instructor:
Andrea Caoili, PhD & Joan Beasley, PhD
Credits: 3.0
When Offered: Fall - Online
Description: In this course you will learn about common mental health conditions and how these conditions may present for individuals with IDD. Social workers in all areas of work need to have base knowledge regarding the treatment approaches for this unique population. The course will focus on applying biopsychosocial, solution-focused, positive approaches and other social work principles to individuals with co-occurring conditions and their systems of support.

SW 897 (4BB) - Understanding Youth with Emotional and Behavioral Challenges
Instructor:
Dr. JoAnne Malloy
When Offered: Spring
Description: This course focuses on the characteristics and needs of youth with emotional and behavioral challenges based upon socio-cultural and ecological theories, and provides exposure to family- and youth-driven practices and approaches that represent System of Care values and principles.

PHP 990 (M1) - Field Study
Instructor: 
Karla Armenti, Ph.D.
Credits: 3.0
Term: Spring
This course provides a 16-week long opportunity for students to synthesize, integrate, and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired during enrollment in the MPH Program and apply them to a public health problem or project in a professional public health practice setting. Students are expected to spend a minimum of 40 hours in the organization (not including preparation time) exploring how that organization deals with a particular public health issue and working on a project for that organization. In addition, students present the findings of their work in a poster session following the conclusion of the course. This public health experience is conducted under the direction of a faculty member and a community public health mentor. This class meets one hour prior to the regularly scheduled core and elective courses in the MPH Program. Prereq: Completion of core courses and permission of course instructor and MPH Program Director.